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Eco-Conscious and Good Looking to Boot, the Art of Furoshiki

In Japan, before mass-produced plastic bags took over, a square of cloth served to wrap purchases of varying shapes and sizes. What the Western world may have derided as a “hobo bundle,” was elevated to a visual art, using traditional Japanese cloths called furoshiki.

Pronounced fu-ro-shkee, this cloth and its historical uses can be traced through the word’s etymology: “furo” means bath and “shiki” means mat. In communal Japanese bath houses, many people brought a cloth with them to wrap up their items while bathing and to use as a mat while getting dressed again.

Throughout the years, folding and tying furoshiki has become an art form in itself that demonstrates the utility and elegance of Japanese design. A traditional furoshiki represents thousands of different ways to wrap almost any object, with different colors and designs conveying unique meanings.

 

Continue reading on KQED Arts:

Eco-Conscious and Good Looking to Boot, the Art of Furoshiki

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One thought on “Eco-Conscious and Good Looking to Boot, the Art of Furoshiki

  1. Pingback: Book Review: A Year in Japan by Kate T. Williamson |

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